Egypt Elections: Egyptian Current Party

The Egyptian Current Party is a moderate Islamist party founded by prominent members of the Muslim Brotherhood youth wing who had become disgruntled with the group’s old guard and were unwilling to join the Freedom and Justice Party. The Egyptian Current Party is not a member of either the Democratic Alliance or Egypt Bloc but is in talks regarding joining the Third Way alliance with al-Adl and al-Wasat.

The Egyptian Current Party is a moderate Islamist party founded by prominent members of the Muslim Brotherhood youth wing who had become disgruntled with the group’s old guard and were unwilling to join the Freedom and Justice Party. The Egyptian Current Party is not a member of either the Democratic Alliance or Egypt Bloc but is in talks regarding joining the Third Way alliance with al-Adl and al-Wasat.

In June 2011, amidst tensions between the youth and leadership of the Muslim Brotherhood, Mohamed al-Kassas, leader of the youth wing of the Muslim Brotherhood, declined to join the Brotherhood’s official Freedom and Justice Party, announcing his intention to form the Egyptian Current Party.  Shortly after the announcement, the Brotherhood expelled al-Kassas. Ahmed Abd al-Gawad, another member of the Brotherhood’s youth wing, joined the party and was also promptly expelled from the Brotherhood. Mutazz Abd al-Fattah and Sayf al-Din Abd al-Fattah, two moderate Islamist intellectuals, are leading members of the party—al-Fattah has stressed the need for Egypt to “be like Turkey.” The party currently has roughly 5000 members, including 200 dissident Muslim Brotherhood members.

Al-Tayar al-Masry supports a civil state and the protection of individual civil liberties, embracing Islamic values without the enforcement of Islamic law. Its slogan is “freedom, building, and pioneering.”  One of its founders, Islam al-Lofty has described the party as “pragmatic and non-ideological.” Although on paper the position of the Egyptian Current is very similar to that of the Freedom and Justice Party, its leaders have criticized the Muslim Brotherhood for its archaic values and for opposing diversity.

Platform:
Political Issues: 

  • Embracing democracy and political participation from all Egyptians
  • Providing equal rights to all citizens regardless of creed, race or social status
  • Calling for a civil state in Egypt with Islamic values and not an Islamic state
  • Advocating for good governance and the development of civil society
  • Ending military trials of civilians

Socio-economic Issues:

  • Making Egypt one of the ten wealthiest and scientifically advanced countries in the world by 2030
  • Advocating for social justice and the fair redistribution of wealth
  • Investing in education to increase social capital
  • Guaranteeing equal opportunities to all Egyptians regardless of background
  • Providing adequate housing and universal health insurance for all Egyptians
  • Decreasing poverty

Foreign Policy Issues:

  • Affirming Egypt’s identity as Islamic, Arab, and African, and working to strengthen its ties with its sister countries
  • Giving priority to promoting reform in the Islamic, Arab, and African worlds

Major Party Figures:
Mohamed al-Kassas: Founder
Islam Lotfy: Founder
Ahmed Abd al-Gawad: Founder

Websites:
http://www.tayarmasry.com/
https://www.facebook.com/TMParty?sk=info (Facebook)

From Guide to Egypt’s Transition, Carnegie Endowment for International Peacehttp://egyptelections.carnegieendowment.org/2011/09/21/al-tayar-al-masry-egyptian-current-party

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing cooperation between nations and promoting active international engagement by the United States. Founded in 1910, its work is nonpartisan and dedicated to achieving practical results.

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